2021 Summer Collaboration Meeting

America/Los_Angeles
Description

The 13th in the series of twice-yearly CMB-S4 workshops will focus on continuing the development of the broadest possible CMB-S4 science case, including in conjunction with other experiments and observatories. It will be a fully online meeting open to CMB-S4 members and non-members alike.

Please familiarize yourself with the meeting code of conduct (linked below) and respect it in all venues.

Connect to the meeting using the zoom app (version 5.3 or later), set your name to "First Last (preferred pronouns)", and mute your microphone. To ask a question please raise your hand or post it to the chat.

The workshop will include:

  • Social time before and after each day's session in gather.town, including career/networking and EPO gatherings
  • A session on "Creating Communities of Care" followed by an open discussion with our new Equity, Diversity & Inclusion committee
  • A poster session repeated late Tuesday and early Friday
  • A closed Junior member session
  • A "Teen Jeopardy" EPO event

The core of the workshop will be the 9 science themes, each of which will include a plenary introduction, an extended parallel session, and a plenary summary report. The themes and their conveners are:

Synergies of Large Scale Structure Surveys with CMB-S4 (Andrina Nicola & Emmanuel Schaan)

We will discuss what can only be learned from joint analyses of CMB-S4 and contemporaneous LSS observations at all wavelengths. We will review the landscape of LSS spectroscopic surveys (eg, MegaMapper, Mauna Kea Spectroscopic Explorer), photometric surveys (Rubin, Euclid, Roman), intensity mapping experiments (eg, PUMA) and more. We will point out the cosmology, astrophysics and systematics which benefit most from these synergies (eg, Nx2pt, CMB lensing tomography, kSZ, galaxy lensing calibration, cluster cosmology).

Gravitational Waves (Raphael Flauger & Sarah Shandera)

Gravitational waves provide an unobstructed view of the dynamics of the universe through cosmic history.  Measurements of the CMB, including T, E, and B-modes, inform our understanding of both primordial gravitational waves and potentially sources that could be observed by direct measurements.  This session will consider observables beyond the tensor-to-scalar ratio, and will explore the complementarity of these probes as well as opportunities to make more direct contact between these communities.

The Time-Varying mm-Wave Sky (Gregg Hallinan & Anna Ho)

Recent results from ACT & SPT have demonstrated that CMB experiments can track the dynamic mm-wave sky, with detections of flaring stars and strongly varying extragalactic sources. Searches are underway for new planets in our solar system and GRBs, and there are opportunities for multi-messenger events, such as high-energy neutrinos or gravitational waves. This session will review recent transient science at millimeter wavelengths, with a focus on gamma-ray bursts and stellar flares. We will use these results to discuss what can be achieved with the CMB-S4 surveys.

Backlighting the Baryons with CMB-S4 (Simone Ferraro &  Alexie Leauthaud)

CMB-S4 will fully determine the gas thermodynamics in unexplored environments: the outskirts of low-mass, high-redshift halos. We will discuss the complementarity of CMB (kSZ, tSZ and lensing) with other probes (eg, X rays and QSO absorption lines), and what we they will tell us about galaxy formation, cosmological hydro simulations and baryonic effects in weak lensing.

Messengers from the Early Universe (Nathaniel Craig & Joel Meyers)

Little is known about the history of the universe between the end of inflation and the beginning of big bang nucleosynthesis.  It is during this period that the dark matter and the baryon asymmetry were produced, the origin of each being enormous unsolved problems in astroparticle physics. It may even be important for the origin of the Higgs mass or the strong CP problem.  Relics from this era will leave signatures in both the primary CMB and secondaries, like CMB lensing, often appearing as corrections to Neff and/or the sum of the neutrino masses.  In this session, we will explore the myriad of connections between problems in comic history, fundamental physics and astrophysics that can be addressed through precision measurements of the CMB.

The Galactic ISM in 3D (Brandon Hensley & Gina Panopoulou)

CMB-S4 will make sensitive, high-resolution measurements of the Galactic polarized dust and synchrotron emission over large areas of the sky. We will discuss how these data can probe gas, dust, and magnetic fields over a range of scales, with particular emphasis on synergies with other datasets that enable a three-dimensional view.

From the Dark Ages to Reionization with CMB-S4 (Marcelo Alvarez & Zhilei Xu)

The history of the Universe between recombination and reionization remains mostly an unexplored territory. Reionization leaves imprints on the CMB temperature and polarization (mean optical depth, kSZ, patchy tau). In this session, we will discuss methods of measuring these effects directly from CMB and using cross-correlations utilizing the synergies with galaxy surveys or line intensity mapping. We will also discuss what these measurements tell us about the physics of reionization.

Astrophysics and Cosmology with Galaxy Clusters (Srinivasan Raghunathan &  Heidi Wu)

CMB-S4 will make a giant leap in the field of cluster astrophysics and cosmology by producing a mass-limited catalogue containing 10^5 clusters with close to 1000 distant clusters out to z~>2. In this session we will discuss how these detections and the synergy of CMB-S4 with optical/X-ray surveys such as DES, LSST, eROSITA and the future Lynx/Athena missions will help us understand the physics of the intracluster medium and constrain the model of structure formation in the Universe.

Snowmass Planning and CMB-S4 (Clarence Chang & Scott Dodelson)

Snowmass is a planning exercise for the particle physics community to identify the key questions and opportunities that will inform the strategic plan for the field in the coming decades.  CMB-S4 is the definitive ground-based CMB survey that will allow for deep cosmological insights into particle physics.  This session will bring together Snowmass organizers and members of the CMB-S4 community to identify the opportunities for synergy and cross-collaboration among the communities.

Registration
Participants
Participants
  • Abigail Crites
  • Abigail Vieregg
  • Adam Anderson
  • Adrian Lee
  • Agustin Romero
  • Akito Kusaka
  • Alec Hryciuk
  • Aleksandra Kusiak
  • Alessio Spurio Mancini
  • Alex Amon
  • Alex Drlica-Wagner
  • Alex Hall
  • Alex Krolewski
  • Alexander van Engelen
  • Alexie Leauthaud
  • Allen Foster
  • Amanda MacInnis
  • Amber Lennox
  • Amel Durakovic
  • Amy Bender
  • Amy Lowitz
  • Andrea Zonca
  • Andrei Linde
  • Andrina Nicola
  • Anirban Das
  • Anirban Roy
  • Anna Coerver
  • Anna Ho
  • Anna Kofman
  • Anthony Challinor
  • Anton Baleato Lizancos
  • Antonio de Ugarte Postigo
  • Antony Lewis
  • Antony Stark
  • Anze Slosar
  • Arefe Abghari
  • Ari Cukierman
  • Ari Kaplan
  • Aritoki Suzuki
  • Arwa Abdulghafour
  • Asantha Cooray
  • Aurel Schneider
  • Ayanna Mann
  • Bai-Qiang Qiang
  • Behzad Ansarinejad
  • Bei Zhou
  • Ben Thorne
  • Benjamin Floyd
  • Benjamin Saliwanchik
  • Benjamin Schmitt
  • Benjamin Wallisch
  • Bennjamin Beringue
  • Bhavna Nayak
  • Blake Sherwin
  • Bobby Besuner
  • Bohdan Bidenko
  • Bradford Benson
  • Bradley Johnson
  • Brady Dye
  • Brandon Hensley
  • Brandon Stevenson
  • Brenna Flaugher
  • Brian Koopman
  • Bruce Partridge
  • Brynn Price
  • Cade Boggan
  • Cail Daley
  • Carlo Baccigalupi
  • Carlos Hervias-Caimapo
  • Cassie Reuter
  • Caterina Umilta
  • Cesiley King
  • Chandra Shekhar Saraf
  • Chang Feng
  • Chi Tian
  • Chris Munson
  • Chris Tandoi
  • Christian Reichardt
  • Chunyu Lu
  • Clara Vergès
  • Clarence Chang
  • Clarke Esmerian
  • Claude-Andre Faucher-Giguere
  • Clem Pryke
  • Colin Bischoff
  • Colin Hill
  • Congyao Zhang
  • Cora Dvorkin
  • Corwin Shiu
  • Craig Hogan
  • Cyndia Yu
  • Cynthia Trendafilova
  • Cyril Creque-Sarbinowski
  • Daan Meerburg
  • Daisuke Nagai
  • Daniel Dutcher
  • Daniel Green
  • Daniel Grin
  • Darby Kramer
  • Darcy Barron
  • David Alonso
  • David Curtin
  • David Goldfinger
  • David Schlegel
  • David Zegeye
  • Dayna Jackson
  • Debbie Bard
  • Deirdre Shoemaker
  • Del Johnson
  • Dennis Lee
  • Dick Bond
  • Dick Plambeck
  • Diego Garza
  • Dmitry Blinov
  • Dominic Beck
  • Don Mitchell
  • Don Petravick
  • Dongwon Han
  • Dongwoo Chung
  • Donna Kubik
  • Douglas Scott
  • Drew Baden
  • Duncan Watts
  • Eduardo Schiappucci
  • Edward Wollack
  • Elena Orlando
  • Elena Pierpaoli
  • Eleonora Di Valentino
  • Eli Dart
  • Elle Shaw
  • Ely Kovetz
  • Emma Hand
  • Emmanuel Schaan
  • Eric Baxter
  • Eric Gawiser
  • Eric Guzman
  • Eric Hivon
  • Eric Linder
  • Erik Rosenberg
  • Erik Shirokoff
  • Erin Healy
  • Erwin Lau
  • Evan Grohs
  • Evan McDonough
  • Eve Vavagiakis
  • Fabio Noviello
  • Federico Bianchini
  • Federico Nati
  • Fei Ge
  • Felipe Maldonado
  • Felipe Menanteau
  • Florian Beutler
  • Francis-Yan Cyr-Racine
  • Frederick Matsuda
  • Gabriel Vasquez
  • Gabriela Marques
  • Gensheng Wang
  • George Halal
  • Gerrit Farren
  • Gil Holder
  • Gina Panopoulou
  • Giulio Fabbian
  • Giuseppe Puglisi
  • Grace Chesmore
  • Grant Teply
  • Grant Tremblay
  • Gregg Hallinan
  • Gregory Daues
  • Gregory Tucker
  • Gunther Haller
  • Han Aung
  • Heather McCarrick
  • Heidi Wu
  • Heyang Long
  • Hogan Nguyen
  • Hong-Ming Zhu
  • Howard Hui
  • Hsiao-Mei Sherry Cho
  • Hung-I Yang
  • Hy Trac
  • Ian Birdwell
  • Ian Gullett
  • Imran Sultan
  • Inigo Zubeldia
  • Ioana Zelko
  • Irina Zhuravleva
  • Jack Sayers
  • Jacques Delabrouille
  • Jae Hwan Kang
  • James Aguirre
  • James Bartlett
  • James Cornelison
  • James Mertens
  • Jamie Bock
  • Jaroslaw Nowak
  • Jason Austermann
  • Jazmine Jefferson
  • Jeff McMahon
  • Jeff Zivick
  • Jeffrey Filippini
  • Jens Chluba
  • Jesse Treu
  • Jessica Muir
  • Jia Liu
  • Jian Yao
  • Jianjie Zhang
  • JiJi Fan
  • Joaquin Vieira
  • Joe Ryan
  • Joel Meyers
  • Johanna Nagy
  • John Carlstrom
  • John Corlett
  • John Hood
  • John Joseph
  • John Kovac
  • John Ruhl
  • Jon-Edward Stokes
  • Jordan Mirocha
  • Jorge L. Cervantes-Cota
  • Jose María Ezquiaga
  • Joseph Eimer
  • Joseph Mohr
  • Josh Dillon
  • Joshua Kim
  • Joshua Sobrin
  • Juan Diego Soler
  • Julian Borrill
  • Julien Carron
  • Juliet Crowell
  • Junhan Kim
  • Junsong Cang
  • Justin Clancy
  • Kam Arnold
  • Kanak Sharma
  • Karen Perez Sarmiento
  • Karthik Prabhu
  • Kathy Turner
  • Katie Harrington
  • KAUSHIK MUKHERJEE
  • Ke Fang
  • Kelly Stifter
  • Ken Ganga
  • Kev Abazajian
  • Kevin Huffenberger
  • Kimberly Boddy
  • Kimmy Wu
  • Kirit Karkare
  • Krista Lynne Smith
  • Kyle Ferguson
  • Laura Fissel
  • Laura Newburgh
  • Leander Thiele
  • Lindsey Bleem
  • Lingzhen Zeng
  • Lloyd Knox
  • Logan Howe
  • Louis Legrand
  • Lukas Hergt
  • Lukas Wenzl
  • Marcelo Alvarez
  • Marco Ajello
  • Marco De Petris
  • Marco Raveri
  • Marcos Tamargo-Arizmendi
  • Margaret Ikape
  • Marharyta Lisovenko
  • Maria Elena Monzani
  • Maria Salatino
  • Marilena Loverde
  • Martin White
  • Martina Gerbino
  • Masashi Hazumi
  • Masaya Hasegawa
  • Matthaeus Leitner
  • Matthew Hasselfield
  • Matthew Low
  • Maude Charmetant
  • Mauricio Pilleux
  • Mehrnoosh Tahani
  • Melanie Archipley
  • Meredith MacGregor
  • Michael Brown
  • Michael Levi
  • Michael Rashkovetskyi
  • Michelle Dolinski
  • Minh Nguyen
  • Miranda Eiben
  • Miriam Rothermel
  • Moritz Münchmeyer
  • Murdock Gilchriese
  • Mustafa Amin
  • Myles Pope
  • Naomi Robertson
  • Natalie Roe
  • Nathalie Chicoine
  • Nathan Whitehorn
  • Nathaniel Craig
  • Neelima Sehgal
  • Neil Goeckner-Wald
  • Nicholas Galitzki
  • Nicholas Rodd
  • Nick Emerson
  • Nick Gnedin
  • Nickolas Kokron
  • Nigel Sharp
  • Nils Halverson
  • Noah Sailer
  • Olivier Dore
  • Omar Darwish
  • Osamu Tajima
  • Paolo Campeti
  • Patrick Breysse
  • Paul Chichura
  • Paul Grimes
  • Paul La Plante
  • Pawel Bielewicz
  • Pete Barry
  • Philip Lubin
  • Prakrut Chaubal
  • Raagini Patki
  • Rachel Osten
  • rachel somerville
  • Raelyn Sullivan
  • Raphael Flauger
  • Rashid Sunyaev
  • Rayne Liu
  • Reijo Keskitalo
  • Renata Kallosh
  • Renee Hlozek
  • Riccardo Gualtieri
  • Ripon Saha
  • Robert Caldwell
  • Roger de Belsunce
  • Ronald Smith
  • Rugved Pund
  • Rui An
  • Sam Guns
  • Samantha Walker
  • Sara Simon
  • Sarah Shandera
  • Sasha Buchman
  • Sayan Mandal
  • Scott Chapman
  • scott chapman
  • Scott Dodelson
  • Scott Paine
  • Scott Watson
  • Sebastian Belkner
  • Sebastian Bocquet
  • Selim Hotinli
  • Seth Koren
  • Shannon Duff
  • Shaul Hanany
  • Shawn Henderson
  • Shouvik Roy Choudhury
  • Shuyu Wang
  • Simon Dicker
  • Simone Ferraro
  • Sreevani Jarugula
  • Srinivasan Raghunathan
  • Sriram Swamynathan
  • Stacie Moltner
  • Stefano Mandelli
  • Stephanie Escoffier
  • Stephen Padin
  • Steven Allen
  • Steven Benton
  • Steven Gratton
  • Supranta Sarma Boruah
  • Suren Gourapura
  • Susan Clark
  • Susmita Adhikari
  • Suvodip Mukherjee
  • T.S.Sachin Venkatesh
  • Tanay Bhandarkar
  • Tania Regimbau
  • Tanmoy Laskar
  • Tanveer Karim
  • Tesla Jeltema
  • Theodore Kisner
  • Tiana Pyer-Pereira
  • Tijmen de Haan
  • Tim Norton
  • Tim Pearson
  • Tom Cecil
  • Tom Crawford
  • Tommaso Ghigna
  • Tony Mroczkowski
  • Toshiya Namikawa
  • Tracey Holmes
  • Tran Tsan
  • Troy Porter
  • Tsung-Han Yeh
  • Tucker Elleflot
  • Tyler Natoli
  • Tyler St. Germaine
  • Utkarsh Giri
  • Valentina Fanfani
  • Vibor Jelic
  • Vickie Sides
  • Victor Buza
  • Victor Robles
  • Vittorio Ghirardini
  • Vladimir Papitashvili
  • Volodymyr Yefremenko
  • Vyoma Muralidhara
  • Wang Wang
  • Wei Quan
  • Weishuang Xu
  • Will Coulton
  • William Holzapfel
  • William Jones
  • Xiaohan Wu
  • Yan-Chuan Cai
  • Yilun Guan
  • Yin-Zhe Ma
  • Yogesh Mehta
  • Yuji Chinone
  • Yuka Nakato
  • Yun-Ting Cheng
  • Yunfei Wen
  • Yuuki Omori
  • Zachary Curtis-Ginsberg
  • Zeeshan Ahmed
  • Zhilei Xu
  • Zhiyuan Yao
  • Zhuowen Zhang
Videoconference Rooms
Zoom Meeting ID
95139318604
Description
The zoom room for all plenary sessions, including the science theme introductions and summaries.
Host
Scientific Organizing Committee
Alternative host
Julian Borrill
Zoom URL
    • 07:00 08:00
      Gather.Town: Social

      https://gather.town/app/j2Ozbwz01WxI9YKH/CMB-S4

    • 08:00 09:25
      Plenary
      • 08:00
        Welcome & Logistics 15m
        Speaker: Julian Borrill (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory & UC Berkeley)
      • 08:15
        Collaboration Update 1h 10m
        Speakers: Abigail Crites (University of Toronto;Dunlap Institute) , Christian Reichardt (University of Melbourne) , Colin Bischoff (University of Cincinnati) , Darcy Barron (University of New Mexico) , Gregory Tucker (Brown University) , Joel Meyers (Southern Methodist University;) , John Carlstrom (University of Chicago;Argonne National Laboratory) , Julian Borrill (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory & UC Berkeley) , Kevin Huffenberger (Florida State University) , Lindsey Bleem (Argonne National Laboratory & KICP) , Lloyd Knox (UC Davis) , Renee Hlozek (University of Toronto) , Sara Simon (Fermilab)
    • 09:25 10:00
      Break 35m
    • 10:00 10:50
      Plenary
    • 10:50 11:10
      Break 20m
    • 11:10 13:10
      EDI Event: Creating Communities of Care 2h

      Learn how your individual actions, attitudes and behaviors can cultivate cultures of inclusion in the groups and organizations you join. This workshop session will cover principles of effective allyship, developing resiliency for ongoing diversity work, and skills for bystander intervention in the face of bias.

      Notes/References:
      - BIPOC: Black, Indigenous, & People of Color
      - PBS documentary "Race: the Power of an Illusion", episode 3 on housing
      - “Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack” by Peggy McIntosh

      Speakers: Tiana Pyer-Pereira, Vickie Sides (U Chicago Staff)
    • 13:10 13:30
      Break 20m
    • 13:30 14:00
      Discussion Session With EDI Committee 30m
      Speaker: Sara Simon (Fermilab)
    • 14:00 15:00
      Gather.Town: Social

      https://gather.town/app/j2Ozbwz01WxI9YKH/CMB-S4

    • 07:00 08:00
      Gather.Town: Social

      https://gather.town/app/j2Ozbwz01WxI9YKH/CMB-S4

    • 08:00 09:15
      Plenary
      • 08:00
        EPO: Karsh STEM Scholars Program 1h

        Ron H. Smith is the Director of the Howard University Karsh STEM Scholars Program. The Karsh STEM Scholars Program currently supports 122 STEM Scholars throughout their academic journey, with the goal of the Scholars receiving a Ph.D. in a STEM field. Students start in the program during their undergraduate years and continue through the completion of their graduate degree. In this session, Mr.
        Smith will highlight this award-winning program by sharing the vision for the program and how it developed. He will also highlight the prestigious accomplishments of the program’s Scholars. 

        The Howard University Karsh STEM Scholars Program received the 2020 Inspiring Programs in STEM Award from INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine, the largest and oldest diversity and inclusion publication in higher education. This Award honors colleges and universities that encourage and assist students from underrepresented groups in their pursuit of careers in the
        fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

        Speakers: Juliet Crowell (University of Chicago;) , Ronald Smith (Howard University)
      • 09:00
        Fireslides 15m
        Speaker: Matthaeus Leitner (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)
    • 09:15 09:45
      Junior Member Closed Session 30m
      Zoom Meeting ID
      92540544326
      Host
      Junior Scientist Advancement Committee
      Zoom URL

      A closed session for junior members and non-members only convened by the Governing Board postdoctoral representative, Ben Schmitt.

      See videoconference room link for connection details.

      Speaker: Benjamin Schmitt (Harvard University;)
    • 09:15 09:45
      Senior Member Feedback Session 30m

      This session will be held in parallel with the closed junior member feedback session. This is not a closed session, and all attendees are welcome to join.

      We will discuss ideas for what kinds of programs we can or should support as a growing collaboration, and how to get more junior and senior members involved in these efforts.

      Potential discussion topics include:
      - How and when to start a mentorship program
      - How to support people writing proposals for CMB-S4 related funding
      - How to get more people engaged in CMB-S4 governance
      - How to support members applying for faculty positions

      Hosted by:
      Darcy Barron (chair of Junior Scientist Advancement Committee)
      Lindsey Bleem (chair of Governing Board)
      Sara Simon (chair of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion committee)

      Speakers: Darcy Barron (University of New Mexico) , Lindsey Bleem (Argonne National Laboratory & KICP) , Sara Simon (Fermilab)
    • 09:45 10:05
      Break 20m
    • 10:05 10:20
      Synergies of Large Scale Structure Surveys with CMB-S4: Plenary Introduction
      Conveners: Andrina Nicola (Princeton University) , Emmanuel Schaan (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory;)

      Notes and discussions

       

       


      Anze Slosar

       

      Notes:

      • Surveys interacting with S4: live on k-plane

      • Taxonomy of surveys: 

        • projected tracers (CMB lensing, WL, GC): low k_perp, no k_par 

        • Spec surveys: all plane

        • Foregrounded: no kpar

      • Cross-correlation: overlap in k modes

      • Proj: no redshift specificity

      • Spectro: full 3D, xcorr with CMB only small slice, high SN

      • Foregrounded: no kpar, 21cm, do not overlap with CMB lensing (projected)

      • Redshift specificity helps a lot - 3x2pt, CMB lensing

      • Higher order stats: allow you to combine things that don’t necessarily overlap on k plane

      • Field reconstructions to recover lost k modes, e.g. 21cm, reconstruct initial modes

      • CMB: lensing (complete, sample-variance cancelation), tSZ/kSZ, ISW, moving lens, patchy reionization - xcorr with 21cm

      • Combine kSZ ML: Hotinli et al.

       

      Questions:

      • Most promising avenue for CMB x 21cm?
        → Probably tidal reconstruction or lensing reconstruction

       

       


      Utkarsh Giri

       

      Notes:

      • kSZ: CMB photon scattering by moving electrons

      • Sec. anisotropy prop to velocity and electron density

      • Fixed realization of vr produces non-vanishing correlation between deltag and T -> reconstruct velocity mode

      • Vr probes large scale cosmological modes, on large scales: cosmological fields linearly related, on large scales - vr reconstruction noise smaller than GC shot noise

      • Application: fNL, sample variance cancelation due to additional tracers

      • Use vr as additional tracer -> strong fNL constraints

      • Question: rely on linear noise models, nonlinearities?

      • Use sims to investigate noise assumptions: 2-3 times larger noise for reconstructions due to nonlinear noises (similar to CMB lensing biases) N1, N3/2

      • Noises can be captured analytically

      • Use sims to check SVC - 


       

      Questions:

       

      Blake: is it obvious why the N3/2 bias is a lot bigger than the N1? (Sorry if I missed this.) 

      Manu: How important is accurate modeling of N32?

       

      Colin: what sets the scale at which N3/2 peaks?

       

       


      David Alonso

       

      Notes:

      • Projected tracers, e.g. LSST, tracers of matter fluctuations

      • Focus on CMB lensing and WL, GC

      • tSZ tomography: cross-correlate tSZ with clustering - constrain gas pressure / mass bias

      • Cluster mass calibration - high-z clusters

      • Tomography: reconstruct redshift dependence, Nx2pt

      • Use tomography to constrain growth - break bias - growth degeneracy with CMB lensing

      • Growth reconstruction: check probe consistency, consistency with LCDM

        • Two data sets: DECALS, KiDS / DES / Planck

        • Decouple growth from background - growth spline with nodes

        • S8(z): data comb gives evidence of lower growth at 0.2<z<0.6 -> driven by shear

        • Need CMB lensing for high-z

        • LCDM good fit with lower S8

      • Systematics:

        • Photoz uncertainties: analytic marg, self-calib, CMB x less sensitive

        • Shear calibration:

        • Galaxy bias: hybrid EFT


       

      Questions:


       

       


      Alex Krolewski

       

      Notes:

      • Improve on CMB lensing auto with GC - growth of structure, brings in galaxy bias -> need all probes

      • Related to S8 tension

      • Use CMB lensing as xcheck of optical lensing

      • Pick galaxy sample with high S/N

        • High z - overlap with lensing kernel

        • Angular coverage

        • WISE: infrared galaxy survey: all-sky, gals with old stellar pops can be easier to detect in WISE

      • Three galaxy samples: blue, red, green z~0.6 - z~1.5

      • Need to remove stars using GAIA - contamination left 1%

      • Redshift distribution: no photoz - > do cross-correlation redshifts with specs, measure n(z) and bias evolution, so just include measured relations in theory

      • Theory: linear + HO bias (dominated by linear modes), allows fix cosmo & HO bias

      • Tests on mocks, calibration of scales used, lmax~250-300

      • Redshift uncertainty: run sep. chains for all nz realizations -> full shape marg.

      • Results: samples consistent, 2.6sigma tension with Planck in S8


       

      Questions:

      David A.: Can you say a bit more about the N(z) marginalization using clustering redshifts? E.g. do you need to worry about the fact that the measurements allow for negative values?

      Blake: If I recall right, DES obtained the same S8-only constraint but did not report tension with Planck when considering the full posterior. Could you remind me how you obtained the 2.6sigma tension number and could a similar effect operate here?

       

       


      Yan-Chuan Cai

       

      Notes:

      • ISW and CMB lensing around substructures

      • ISW and CMB lensing: Sourced by same late-time grav potential 

      • ISW: probe of accelerated expansion - time-varying potentials

      • Photons in voids: cold-spot in CMB, photons in clusters: hot spot

      • Usually: cross-correlations between primary CMB and LSS tracers (e.g. lensing)

        • Joint measurements of GC, CMB lensing, ISW

      • Why superstructures?

        • Look at generalization of cluster cosmology, peak counts, etc.

        • Beyond 2pt

        • Beyond GR - different behaviour in high/low density regions

        • Granett et al., 2008: amplitude of stacked CMB temperature high compared to LCDM expectation

        • Question: what is the cause for this?

      • Repeat analysis using DESI legacy survey 

        • reduce sample variance

        • No detection for temperature imprints from supervoids 

       

      Questions:

      Jia: why is there no lack of signal for void (but it is there for clusters..)? I.e.why “lensing is low” is not impacting void? Answer: could be related to photo-z bias, or something physical (e.g. neutrino free-streaming) but no definitive answer.

      David A.: there was a recent paper measuring a negative ISW from voids at very high redshifts from QSOs. Do you have any thoughts on that? (this one)

      Yan-Chuan Cai: Yes. I think the statistical significance isn’t very high,less than 3sigma I think, similar to many other analyses. It would be great to have more volume to beat down the variance.

       


      Leander Thiele

       

      Notes:

      • NNs to map N-bodies to baryons: CNN / DeepSet

      • Predict baryonic fields from DM only - baryons local, i.e. use local ML approach

      • Usage:

        • Rapidly generate sims

        • Interpret trained model and learn about astro

      • CNN:

        • DM -> pe, ne

        • Use CNN on 3D field, redshift zero

        • Semianalytic models

        • Main problem: sparsity, only small fraction of volume is interesting, overcome by biasing training sample using zoom-ins

        • Electron pressure spans large dynamic range (input trafos, semi-analytic model)

        • Small scales well fit, large scales better than models, projection improves performance

      • DeepSet:

        • Concentrate on massive halos -> no transl symmetry

        • CNNs not best approach: spend lot of resource on empty regions, poor interpretability

        • Idea: can we use simulations representation to train NN? - DeepSet VAE

        • Restricted architecture improves on existing models


       

      Questions:

      • Interpolate between baryonic feedback models? Train on one sim and then do transfer learning on other sim


       

       


      Jia Liu

       

      Notes:

      • Why sims? Test pipelines, systematics, astrophysics, covariance, modeling

      • Why correlated? CMB foregrounds and LSS, not super useful for survey systematics because will be uncorrelated, but extragalactic, astrophysics syst will show up differently, input to train ML models

      • Typical CMB sims: 2D, gravity only, CMB observables painted -> Sehgal, Stein

      • Typical LSS sims: 2/3D, more cosmo, hydro/gravity only, curved/flat, smaller boxes

      • Correlated sims need to accommodate both worlds

      • current : run by experts in both areas

      • Yuuki Omori: MultiDark Planck 2

      • Roadmap:

        • Basis: gravity-only sims

        • Then send off to experts and paint on CMB / LSS observables

        • Coordination!

        • How to get gravity-only sims: fast full-sky lightcone (e.g. COLA, FastPM)

        • Challenges: computing, storage, requirements, maintenance, personnel

       

      Questions:


       

       


      Dongwon ‘DW’ Han

       

      Notes:

      • Need correlated sims: high-res, multi-frequency, need NG info

      • Computationally expensive -> use DL

      • mmDL: CMB kappa -> NG kappa, kSZ, tSZ, CIB, radio + lensed TUQ

      • Network:

        • Data augmentation, not enough sims

        • Conversion / prediction

        • NG restoration step

      • Results:

        • Reproduce source counts, power spectra, cross-correlations, bispectra, trispectra (CMB lensing biases)

        • Network can recover correlations between large and small scales even though trained on small patches

        • Variance in sims comparable to Knox

      • Sims available publicly

      • Allow mass-production of independent full-sky realizations

      • Fast: forward-modeling

      • Future:

        • Fixed cosmology - CAMELS?

        • Missing associated catalog - extension to create catalogs

        • Can we use network to learn optimal summary stats?


       

      Questions:




       

      • 10:05
        Synergies of Large Scale Structure Surveys with CMB-S4: Plenary Introduction 15m
        Speaker: Emmanuel Schaan (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory;)
    • 10:20 10:35
      Messengers from the Early Universe: Plenary Introduction
      Conveners: Joel Meyers (Southern Methodist University;) , Nathaniel Craig (UC Santa Barbara)
    • 10:35 10:50
      The Time-Varying mm-Wave Sky: Plenary Introduction
      Conveners: Anna Ho (UC;LBL) , Gregg Hallinan (Caltech)
    • 10:50 11:10
      Break 20m
    • 11:10 14:00
      Messengers from the Early Universe: Parallel
      Zoom Meeting ID
      92828721351
      Host
      Low-ell BB Working Group
      Zoom URL
      Conveners: Joel Meyers (Southern Methodist University;) , Nathaniel Craig (UC Santa Barbara)
      • 11:10
        Cosmological Constraints on Light (but Massive) Relics 10m
        Speaker: Weishuang Xu (Harvard)
      • 11:20
        CMB S4: Gatekeeper of Dark Complexity 20m

        CMB measurements have unique and almost completely model-independent sensitivity to new light degrees of freedom. As a result, whole classes of dark sectors and dark matter models should produce a signal at CMB S4. Non-detection would severely constrain the space of possible solutions for fundamental puzzles like the nature of dark matter or the hierarchy problem. Positive detection would confirm physics beyond the Standard Model and lend strong motivation to non-minimal dark sectors, and I will outline the variety of exciting new astrophysical and cosmological signals that could be generated by such scenarios: formation of mirror stars and their signals in optical, X-ray, gravitational lensing or gravitational wave observations; direct detection of atomic dark matter with dark plasma screening effects in terrestrial experiments or stellar cooling; and combining full MHD N-body simulations of atomic dark matter with measurements of galactic structure to determine the forces active in the dark sector.

        Speaker: David Curtin (University of Toronto)
      • 11:40
        CMB and BBN constraints on light thermally coupled WIMPs 10m
        Speaker: Rui An (University of Southern California)
      • 11:50
        Discussion 35m
        Speakers: Joel Meyers (Southern Methodist University;) , Nathaniel Craig (UC Santa Barbara)
      • 12:25
        Mid-Parallel Break 20m
      • 12:45
        Modulating fields and the CMB 20m
        Speaker: Prof. JiJi Fan (Brown University)
      • 13:05
        Probing Axion Couplings to Matter with N_{eff} Measurements 10m
        Speaker: Benjamin Wallisch (UC San Diego & Institute for Advanced Study)
      • 13:15
        The Cosmic Axion Background 20m

        In this talk I will show that we can detect relativistic axions that are a relic of the early Universe with instruments searching for axion dark matter. I will outline several forms such a cosmic axion background could take, demonstrate how the CaB would appear at an axion haloscope, and explain why current analyses would discard any emerging signal as a background.

        Speaker: Dr Nicholas Rodd (CERN)
      • 13:35
        Discussion 25m
        Speakers: Joel Meyers (Southern Methodist University;) , Nathaniel Craig (UC Santa Barbara)
    • 11:10 14:00
      Synergies of Large Scale Structure Surveys with CMB-S4: Parallel
      Zoom Meeting ID
      91640258282
      Host
      Clusters Working Group
      Zoom URL
      Conveners: Andrina Nicola (Princeton University) , Emmanuel Schaan (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory;)

      Notes and discussions

       

       


      Anze Slosar

       

      Notes:

      • Surveys interacting with S4: live on k-plane

      • Taxonomy of surveys: 

        • projected tracers (CMB lensing, WL, GC): low k_perp, no k_par 

        • Spec surveys: all plane

        • Foregrounded: no kpar

      • Cross-correlation: overlap in k modes

      • Proj: no redshift specificity

      • Spectro: full 3D, xcorr with CMB only small slice, high SN

      • Foregrounded: no kpar, 21cm, do not overlap with CMB lensing (projected)

      • Redshift specificity helps a lot - 3x2pt, CMB lensing

      • Higher order stats: allow you to combine things that don’t necessarily overlap on k plane

      • Field reconstructions to recover lost k modes, e.g. 21cm, reconstruct initial modes

      • CMB: lensing (complete, sample-variance cancelation), tSZ/kSZ, ISW, moving lens, patchy reionization - xcorr with 21cm

      • Combine kSZ ML: Hotinli et al.

       

      Questions:

      • Most promising avenue for CMB x 21cm?
        → Probably tidal reconstruction or lensing reconstruction

       

       


      Utkarsh Giri

       

      Notes:

      • kSZ: CMB photon scattering by moving electrons

      • Sec. anisotropy prop to velocity and electron density

      • Fixed realization of vr produces non-vanishing correlation between deltag and T -> reconstruct velocity mode

      • Vr probes large scale cosmological modes, on large scales: cosmological fields linearly related, on large scales - vr reconstruction noise smaller than GC shot noise

      • Application: fNL, sample variance cancelation due to additional tracers

      • Use vr as additional tracer -> strong fNL constraints

      • Question: rely on linear noise models, nonlinearities?

      • Use sims to investigate noise assumptions: 2-3 times larger noise for reconstructions due to nonlinear noises (similar to CMB lensing biases) N1, N3/2

      • Noises can be captured analytically

      • Use sims to check SVC - 


       

      Questions:

       

      Blake: is it obvious why the N3/2 bias is a lot bigger than the N1? (Sorry if I missed this.) 

      Manu: How important is accurate modeling of N32?

       

      Colin: what sets the scale at which N3/2 peaks?

       

       


      David Alonso

       

      Notes:

      • Projected tracers, e.g. LSST, tracers of matter fluctuations

      • Focus on CMB lensing and WL, GC

      • tSZ tomography: cross-correlate tSZ with clustering - constrain gas pressure / mass bias

      • Cluster mass calibration - high-z clusters

      • Tomography: reconstruct redshift dependence, Nx2pt

      • Use tomography to constrain growth - break bias - growth degeneracy with CMB lensing

      • Growth reconstruction: check probe consistency, consistency with LCDM

        • Two data sets: DECALS, KiDS / DES / Planck

        • Decouple growth from background - growth spline with nodes

        • S8(z): data comb gives evidence of lower growth at 0.2<z<0.6 -> driven by shear

        • Need CMB lensing for high-z

        • LCDM good fit with lower S8

      • Systematics:

        • Photoz uncertainties: analytic marg, self-calib, CMB x less sensitive

        • Shear calibration:

        • Galaxy bias: hybrid EFT


       

      Questions:


       

       


      Alex Krolewski

       

      Notes:

      • Improve on CMB lensing auto with GC - growth of structure, brings in galaxy bias -> need all probes

      • Related to S8 tension

      • Use CMB lensing as xcheck of optical lensing

      • Pick galaxy sample with high S/N

        • High z - overlap with lensing kernel

        • Angular coverage

        • WISE: infrared galaxy survey: all-sky, gals with old stellar pops can be easier to detect in WISE

      • Three galaxy samples: blue, red, green z~0.6 - z~1.5

      • Need to remove stars using GAIA - contamination left 1%

      • Redshift distribution: no photoz - > do cross-correlation redshifts with specs, measure n(z) and bias evolution, so just include measured relations in theory

      • Theory: linear + HO bias (dominated by linear modes), allows fix cosmo & HO bias

      • Tests on mocks, calibration of scales used, lmax~250-300

      • Redshift uncertainty: run sep. chains for all nz realizations -> full shape marg.

      • Results: samples consistent, 2.6sigma tension with Planck in S8


       

      Questions:

      David A.: Can you say a bit more about the N(z) marginalization using clustering redshifts? E.g. do you need to worry about the fact that the measurements allow for negative values?

      Blake: If I recall right, DES obtained the same S8-only constraint but did not report tension with Planck when considering the full posterior. Could you remind me how you obtained the 2.6sigma tension number and could a similar effect operate here?

       

       


      Yan-Chuan Cai

       

      Notes:

      • ISW and CMB lensing around substructures

      • ISW and CMB lensing: Sourced by same late-time grav potential 

      • ISW: probe of accelerated expansion - time-varying potentials

      • Photons in voids: cold-spot in CMB, photons in clusters: hot spot

      • Usually: cross-correlations between primary CMB and LSS tracers (e.g. lensing)

        • Joint measurements of GC, CMB lensing, ISW

      • Why superstructures?

        • Look at generalization of cluster cosmology, peak counts, etc.

        • Beyond 2pt

        • Beyond GR - different behaviour in high/low density regions

        • Granett et al., 2008: amplitude of stacked CMB temperature high compared to LCDM expectation

        • Question: what is the cause for this?

      • Repeat analysis using DESI legacy survey 

        • reduce sample variance

        • No detection for temperature imprints from supervoids 

       

      Questions:

      Jia: why is there no lack of signal for void (but it is there for clusters..)? I.e.why “lensing is low” is not impacting void? Answer: could be related to photo-z bias, or something physical (e.g. neutrino free-streaming) but no definitive answer.

      David A.: there was a recent paper measuring a negative ISW from voids at very high redshifts from QSOs. Do you have any thoughts on that? (this one)

      Yan-Chuan Cai: Yes. I think the statistical significance isn’t very high,less than 3sigma I think, similar to many other analyses. It would be great to have more volume to beat down the variance.

       


      Leander Thiele

       

      Notes:

      • NNs to map N-bodies to baryons: CNN / DeepSet

      • Predict baryonic fields from DM only - baryons local, i.e. use local ML approach

      • Usage:

        • Rapidly generate sims

        • Interpret trained model and learn about astro

      • CNN:

        • DM -> pe, ne

        • Use CNN on 3D field, redshift zero

        • Semianalytic models

        • Main problem: sparsity, only small fraction of volume is interesting, overcome by biasing training sample using zoom-ins

        • Electron pressure spans large dynamic range (input trafos, semi-analytic model)

        • Small scales well fit, large scales better than models, projection improves performance

      • DeepSet:

        • Concentrate on massive halos -> no transl symmetry

        • CNNs not best approach: spend lot of resource on empty regions, poor interpretability

        • Idea: can we use simulations representation to train NN? - DeepSet VAE

        • Restricted architecture improves on existing models


       

      Questions:

      • Interpolate between baryonic feedback models? Train on one sim and then do transfer learning on other sim


       

       


      Jia Liu

       

      Notes:

      • Why sims? Test pipelines, systematics, astrophysics, covariance, modeling

      • Why correlated? CMB foregrounds and LSS, not super useful for survey systematics because will be uncorrelated, but extragalactic, astrophysics syst will show up differently, input to train ML models

      • Typical CMB sims: 2D, gravity only, CMB observables painted -> Sehgal, Stein

      • Typical LSS sims: 2/3D, more cosmo, hydro/gravity only, curved/flat, smaller boxes

      • Correlated sims need to accommodate both worlds

      • current : run by experts in both areas

      • Yuuki Omori: MultiDark Planck 2

      • Roadmap:

        • Basis: gravity-only sims

        • Then send off to experts and paint on CMB / LSS observables

        • Coordination!

        • How to get gravity-only sims: fast full-sky lightcone (e.g. COLA, FastPM)

        • Challenges: computing, storage, requirements, maintenance, personnel

       

      Questions:


       

       


      Dongwon ‘DW’ Han

       

      Notes:

      • Need correlated sims: high-res, multi-frequency, need NG info

      • Computationally expensive -> use DL

      • mmDL: CMB kappa -> NG kappa, kSZ, tSZ, CIB, radio + lensed TUQ

      • Network:

        • Data augmentation, not enough sims

        • Conversion / prediction

        • NG restoration step

      • Results:

        • Reproduce source counts, power spectra, cross-correlations, bispectra, trispectra (CMB lensing biases)

        • Network can recover correlations between large and small scales even though trained on small patches

        • Variance in sims comparable to Knox

      • Sims available publicly

      • Allow mass-production of independent full-sky realizations

      • Fast: forward-modeling

      • Future:

        • Fixed cosmology - CAMELS?

        • Missing associated catalog - extension to create catalogs

        • Can we use network to learn optimal summary stats?


       

      Questions:




       

      • 11:10
        Landscape of LSS surveys contemporary to CMB-S4 15m
        Speaker: Anze Slosar (Brookhaven National Laboratory;)
      • 11:25
        Non-Gaussianity from CMB-S4 kSZ & LSS 15m
        Speaker: Utkarsh Giri (Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics)
      • 11:40
        Cosmology from CMB-S4 lensing x LSS 15m
        Speaker: David Alonso (Oxford University;)
      • 11:55
        Cosmology from Planck lensing x unWISE 15m
        Speaker: Alex Krolewski (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)
      • 12:10
        Higher Order Statistics for CMBxLSS 15m
        Speaker: Yan-Chuan Cai (University of Edinburgh)
      • 12:25
        Mid-Parallel Break 20m
      • 12:45
        Mapping Dark Matter to Sunyaev-Zel'dovich with Neural Networks 15m
        Speaker: Leander Thiele (Princeton University)
      • 13:00
        Correlated simulations for CMB and LSS: overview 15m
        Speaker: Jia Liu (UC Berkeley)
      • 13:15
        MillimeterDL: Deep Learning Simulations of the Microwave Sky 15m
        Speaker: Dongwon Han (Stony Brook University)
      • 13:30
        Discussion 30m
    • 11:10 14:00
      The Time-Varying mm-Wave Sky: Parallel
      Zoom Meeting ID
      99212892309
      Host
      Sources Working Group
      Zoom URL
      Conveners: Anna Ho (UC;LBL) , Gregg Hallinan (Caltech)
      • 11:10
        Introduction 5m
        Speakers: Anna Ho (UC;LBL) , Prof. Joaquin Vieira (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign;)
      • 11:15
        GRBs 1: Observations of GRBs in the mm range 20m

        In this talk I will give a brief description of the gamma-ray burst phenomena, will introduce the different types of progenitors, and the model that defines the electromagnetic emission of GRBs. I will focus particularly on the emission in the millimetre range and place this into the context of CMB-S4, giving examples of what we may expect to gain through the observations performed by the new observatory.

        Speaker: Antonio de Ugarte Postigo (IAA-CSIC)
      • 11:35
        GRBs 2: Millimeter Observations of Extragalactic Transients and Prospects for CMB-S4 20m

        The mm-band presents an exciting new discovery space for extragalactic transients, including supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, tidal disruption events, and fast & blue optical transients. I will set the stage via glimpses through the new window opened up by ALMA into the science of such transients, followed by prospects for their detection and characterization with upcoming CMB surveys.

        Speaker: Tanmoy Laskar (University of Bath)
      • 11:55
        Discussion 30m

        For GRB science, what do we need in terms of:
        - Alert stream contents & timescale
        - Additional technical infrastructure / data products

        Do we benefit from a higher-cadence experiment from the Pole? (Higher depth, higher cadence, longer revisit time)

        Speakers: Anna Ho (UC;LBL) , Joaquin Vieira (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign;)
      • 12:25
        Mid-Parallel Break 20m
      • 12:45
        Introduction 5m
        • Review recent results from SPT & ACT
        • Questions to bear in mind during the talks
        Speakers: Anna Ho (UC;LBL) , Joaquin Vieira (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign;)
      • 12:50
        Stellar Flares 1: The Millimeter View of Stellar Flares 20m

        15 min talk + 5 min Q&A

        Speaker: Meredith MacGregor (University of Colorado Boulder)
      • 13:10
        Stellar Flares 2: The Panchromatic View of Stellar Flares 20m

        Talk by Rachel Osten

        Speaker: Rachel Osten (Space Telescope Science Institute)
      • 13:30
        Discussion 30m

        For stellar-flare science, what do we need in terms of:
        - Alert stream contents & timescale
        - Additional technical infrastructure / data products

        Do we benefit from a higher-cadence experiment from the Pole? (Higher depth, higher cadence, longer revisit time)

        Speakers: Anna Ho (UC;LBL) , Joaquin Vieira (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign;)
    • 14:00 15:00
      Gather.Town: Social

      https://gather.town/app/j2Ozbwz01WxI9YKH/CMB-S4

    • 15:00 15:45
      Poster Session in Gather.Town

      https://gather.town/app/j2Ozbwz01WxI9YKH/CMB-S4

    • 07:00 08:00
      Gather.Town: Career/Networking

      https://gather.town/app/j2Ozbwz01WxI9YKH/CMB-S4

    • 08:00 08:35
      Synergies of Large Scale Structure Surveys with CMB-S4: Plenary Summary Report
      Conveners: Andrina Nicola (Princeton University) , Emmanuel Schaan (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory;)

      Notes and discussions

       

       


      Anze Slosar

       

      Notes:

      • Surveys interacting with S4: live on k-plane

      • Taxonomy of surveys: 

        • projected tracers (CMB lensing, WL, GC): low k_perp, no k_par 

        • Spec surveys: all plane

        • Foregrounded: no kpar

      • Cross-correlation: overlap in k modes

      • Proj: no redshift specificity

      • Spectro: full 3D, xcorr with CMB only small slice, high SN

      • Foregrounded: no kpar, 21cm, do not overlap with CMB lensing (projected)

      • Redshift specificity helps a lot - 3x2pt, CMB lensing

      • Higher order stats: allow you to combine things that don’t necessarily overlap on k plane

      • Field reconstructions to recover lost k modes, e.g. 21cm, reconstruct initial modes

      • CMB: lensing (complete, sample-variance cancelation), tSZ/kSZ, ISW, moving lens, patchy reionization - xcorr with 21cm

      • Combine kSZ ML: Hotinli et al.

       

      Questions:

      • Most promising avenue for CMB x 21cm?
        → Probably tidal reconstruction or lensing reconstruction

       

       


      Utkarsh Giri

       

      Notes:

      • kSZ: CMB photon scattering by moving electrons

      • Sec. anisotropy prop to velocity and electron density

      • Fixed realization of vr produces non-vanishing correlation between deltag and T -> reconstruct velocity mode

      • Vr probes large scale cosmological modes, on large scales: cosmological fields linearly related, on large scales - vr reconstruction noise smaller than GC shot noise

      • Application: fNL, sample variance cancelation due to additional tracers

      • Use vr as additional tracer -> strong fNL constraints

      • Question: rely on linear noise models, nonlinearities?

      • Use sims to investigate noise assumptions: 2-3 times larger noise for reconstructions due to nonlinear noises (similar to CMB lensing biases) N1, N3/2

      • Noises can be captured analytically

      • Use sims to check SVC - 


       

      Questions:

       

      Blake: is it obvious why the N3/2 bias is a lot bigger than the N1? (Sorry if I missed this.) 

      Manu: How important is accurate modeling of N32?

       

      Colin: what sets the scale at which N3/2 peaks?

       

       


      David Alonso

       

      Notes:

      • Projected tracers, e.g. LSST, tracers of matter fluctuations

      • Focus on CMB lensing and WL, GC

      • tSZ tomography: cross-correlate tSZ with clustering - constrain gas pressure / mass bias

      • Cluster mass calibration - high-z clusters

      • Tomography: reconstruct redshift dependence, Nx2pt

      • Use tomography to constrain growth - break bias - growth degeneracy with CMB lensing

      • Growth reconstruction: check probe consistency, consistency with LCDM

        • Two data sets: DECALS, KiDS / DES / Planck

        • Decouple growth from background - growth spline with nodes

        • S8(z): data comb gives evidence of lower growth at 0.2<z<0.6 -> driven by shear

        • Need CMB lensing for high-z

        • LCDM good fit with lower S8

      • Systematics:

        • Photoz uncertainties: analytic marg, self-calib, CMB x less sensitive

        • Shear calibration:

        • Galaxy bias: hybrid EFT


       

      Questions:


       

       


      Alex Krolewski

       

      Notes:

      • Improve on CMB lensing auto with GC - growth of structure, brings in galaxy bias -> need all probes

      • Related to S8 tension

      • Use CMB lensing as xcheck of optical lensing

      • Pick galaxy sample with high S/N

        • High z - overlap with lensing kernel

        • Angular coverage

        • WISE: infrared galaxy survey: all-sky, gals with old stellar pops can be easier to detect in WISE

      • Three galaxy samples: blue, red, green z~0.6 - z~1.5

      • Need to remove stars using GAIA - contamination left 1%

      • Redshift distribution: no photoz - > do cross-correlation redshifts with specs, measure n(z) and bias evolution, so just include measured relations in theory

      • Theory: linear + HO bias (dominated by linear modes), allows fix cosmo & HO bias

      • Tests on mocks, calibration of scales used, lmax~250-300

      • Redshift uncertainty: run sep. chains for all nz realizations -> full shape marg.

      • Results: samples consistent, 2.6sigma tension with Planck in S8


       

      Questions:

      David A.: Can you say a bit more about the N(z) marginalization using clustering redshifts? E.g. do you need to worry about the fact that the measurements allow for negative values?

      Blake: If I recall right, DES obtained the same S8-only constraint but did not report tension with Planck when considering the full posterior. Could you remind me how you obtained the 2.6sigma tension number and could a similar effect operate here?

       

       


      Yan-Chuan Cai

       

      Notes:

      • ISW and CMB lensing around substructures

      • ISW and CMB lensing: Sourced by same late-time grav potential 

      • ISW: probe of accelerated expansion - time-varying potentials

      • Photons in voids: cold-spot in CMB, photons in clusters: hot spot

      • Usually: cross-correlations between primary CMB and LSS tracers (e.g. lensing)

        • Joint measurements of GC, CMB lensing, ISW

      • Why superstructures?

        • Look at generalization of cluster cosmology, peak counts, etc.

        • Beyond 2pt

        • Beyond GR - different behaviour in high/low density regions

        • Granett et al., 2008: amplitude of stacked CMB temperature high compared to LCDM expectation

        • Question: what is the cause for this?

      • Repeat analysis using DESI legacy survey 

        • reduce sample variance

        • No detection for temperature imprints from supervoids 

       

      Questions:

      Jia: why is there no lack of signal for void (but it is there for clusters..)? I.e.why “lensing is low” is not impacting void? Answer: could be related to photo-z bias, or something physical (e.g. neutrino free-streaming) but no definitive answer.

      David A.: there was a recent paper measuring a negative ISW from voids at very high redshifts from QSOs. Do you have any thoughts on that? (this one)

      Yan-Chuan Cai: Yes. I think the statistical significance isn’t very high,less than 3sigma I think, similar to many other analyses. It would be great to have more volume to beat down the variance.

       


      Leander Thiele

       

      Notes:

      • NNs to map N-bodies to baryons: CNN / DeepSet

      • Predict baryonic fields from DM only - baryons local, i.e. use local ML approach

      • Usage:

        • Rapidly generate sims

        • Interpret trained model and learn about astro

      • CNN:

        • DM -> pe, ne

        • Use CNN on 3D field, redshift zero

        • Semianalytic models

        • Main problem: sparsity, only small fraction of volume is interesting, overcome by biasing training sample using zoom-ins

        • Electron pressure spans large dynamic range (input trafos, semi-analytic model)

        • Small scales well fit, large scales better than models, projection improves performance

      • DeepSet:

        • Concentrate on massive halos -> no transl symmetry

        • CNNs not best approach: spend lot of resource on empty regions, poor interpretability

        • Idea: can we use simulations representation to train NN? - DeepSet VAE

        • Restricted architecture improves on existing models


       

      Questions:

      • Interpolate between baryonic feedback models? Train on one sim and then do transfer learning on other sim


       

       


      Jia Liu

       

      Notes:

      • Why sims? Test pipelines, systematics, astrophysics, covariance, modeling

      • Why correlated? CMB foregrounds and LSS, not super useful for survey systematics because will be uncorrelated, but extragalactic, astrophysics syst will show up differently, input to train ML models

      • Typical CMB sims: 2D, gravity only, CMB observables painted -> Sehgal, Stein

      • Typical LSS sims: 2/3D, more cosmo, hydro/gravity only, curved/flat, smaller boxes

      • Correlated sims need to accommodate both worlds

      • current : run by experts in both areas

      • Yuuki Omori: MultiDark Planck 2

      • Roadmap:

        • Basis: gravity-only sims

        • Then send off to experts and paint on CMB / LSS observables

        • Coordination!

        • How to get gravity-only sims: fast full-sky lightcone (e.g. COLA, FastPM)

        • Challenges: computing, storage, requirements, maintenance, personnel

       

      Questions:


       

       


      Dongwon ‘DW’ Han

       

      Notes:

      • Need correlated sims: high-res, multi-frequency, need NG info

      • Computationally expensive -> use DL

      • mmDL: CMB kappa -> NG kappa, kSZ, tSZ, CIB, radio + lensed TUQ

      • Network:

        • Data augmentation, not enough sims

        • Conversion / prediction

        • NG restoration step

      • Results:

        • Reproduce source counts, power spectra, cross-correlations, bispectra, trispectra (CMB lensing biases)

        • Network can recover correlations between large and small scales even though trained on small patches

        • Variance in sims comparable to Knox

      • Sims available publicly

      • Allow mass-production of independent full-sky realizations

      • Fast: forward-modeling

      • Future:

        • Fixed cosmology - CAMELS?

        • Missing associated catalog - extension to create catalogs

        • Can we use network to learn optimal summary stats?


       

      Questions:




       

      • 08:00
        Synergies of Large Scale Structure Surveys with CMB-S4: Plenary Summary Report 35m
        Speaker: Andrina Nicola (Princeton University)
    • 08:35 09:10
      Messengers from the Early Universe: Plenary Summary Report
      Conveners: Joel Meyers (Southern Methodist University;) , Nathaniel Craig (UC Santa Barbara)
      • 08:35
        Messengers from the Early Universe: Plenary Summary Report 35m
        Speaker: Nathaniel Craig (UC Santa Barbara)
    • 09:10 09:45
      The Time-Varying mm-Wave Sky: Plenary Summary Report
      Conveners: Anna Ho (UC;LBL) , Gregg Hallinan (Caltech)
      • 09:10
        The Transient Radio Sky 25m

        20 min talk + 5 min Q&A

        Speaker: Gregg Hallinan (Caltech)
      • 09:35
        The Time-Varying mm-Wave Sky: Recap 10m
        Speaker: Anna Ho (UC;LBL)
    • 09:45 10:05
      Break 20m
    • 10:05 10:20
      Backlighting the Baryons with CMB-S4: Plenary Introduction
      Conveners: Alexie Leauthaud (UCSC) , Simone Ferraro (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)
      • 10:05
        Backlighting the Baryons with CMB-S4: Plenary Introduction 15m
        Speaker: Simone Ferraro (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)
    • 10:20 10:35
      Gravitational Waves: Plenary Introduction
      Conveners: Raphael Flauger (UC San Diego) , Sarah Shandera (Pennsylvania State University;)
      • 10:20
        Gravitational Waves: Plenary Introduction 15m
        Speaker: Raphael Flauger (UC San Diego)
    • 10:35 10:50
      The Galactic ISM in 3D: Plenary Introduction
      Conveners: Brandon Hensley (Princeton University) , Gina Panopoulou (Caltech)
      • 10:35
        The Galactic ISM in 3D: Plenary Introduction 15m
        Speaker: Brandon Hensley (Princeton University)
    • 10:50 11:10
      Break 20m
    • 11:10 14:00
      Backlighting the Baryons with CMB-S4: Parallel
      Zoom Meeting ID
      91794458310
      Host
      Clusters Working Group
      Zoom URL
      Conveners: Alexie Leauthaud (UCSC) , Simone Ferraro (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)
      • 11:10
        Current measurements and future prospects: reconstructed velocities and halo thermodynamics 20m
        Speaker: Emmanuel Schaan (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory;)
      • 11:30
        Current measurements and future prospects: pairwise kSZ 20m
        Speaker: Eve Vavagiakis (Cornell University)
      • 11:50
        Review: baryon effects in weak lensing 20m
        Speaker: Aurel Schneider (University of Zurich)
      • 12:10
        Discussion 15m
      • 12:25
        Mid-Parallel Break 20m
      • 12:45
        SZ calibration of baryon effects 20m
        Speaker: Colin Hill (Columbia)
      • 13:05
        Projected fields kSZ 20m
        Speaker: Aleksandra Kusiak (Columbia University)
      • 13:25
        kSZ as a probe of ultralight axions 10m
        Speaker: Daniel Grin (Haverford College;)
      • 13:35
        Discussion 25m
    • 11:10 14:00
      Gravitational Waves: Parallel
      Zoom Meeting ID
      96316566379
      Host
      Low-ell BB Working Group
      Zoom URL
      Conveners: Raphael Flauger (UC San Diego) , Sarah Shandera (Pennsylvania State University;)
    • 11:10 14:00
      The Galactic ISM in 3D: Parallel
      Zoom Meeting ID
      98345969550
      Host
      Sources Working Group
      Zoom URL
      Conveners: Brandon Hensley (Princeton University) , Gina Panopoulou (Caltech)
      • 11:10
        The ACT View of the Galactic Center 15m
        Speaker: Yilun Guan (University of Pittsburgh)
      • 11:25
        Multi-tracers analysis of the Faraday tomographic data 15m
        Speaker: Vibor Jelic (Ruder Boskovic Institute)
      • 11:40
        Reconstructing 3D magnetic fields associated with filamentary molecular clouds 15m
        Speaker: Mehrnoosh Tahani (National Research Council Canada)
      • 11:55
        Filaments, bubbles, super-bubbles, and other features of the magnetized solar neighborhood 15m
        Speaker: Juan Diego Soler (IAPS - Italian National Institute for Astrophysics)
      • 12:10
        Combining CMB Observations with Extinction Data to Create a 3D Dust Temperature Map 15m
        Speaker: Ioana Zelko (Harvard-CfA-UCLA)
      • 12:25
        Mid-Parallel Break 20m
      • 12:45
        A new 3D model of Galactic microwave foreground dust emission based on filaments 15m
        Speaker: Carlos Hervias-Caimapo (Florida State University;)
      • 13:00
        Discussion 1h
        Speakers: Brandon Hensley (Princeton University) , Carlos Hervias-Caimapo (Florida State University;) , Gina Panopoulou (Caltech) , Ioana Zelko (Harvard-CfA-UCLA) , Juan Diego Soler (IAPS - Italian National Institute for Astrophysics) , Mehrnoosh Tahani (National Research Council Canada) , Vibor Jelic (Ruder Boskovic Institute) , Yilun Guan (University of Pittsburgh)
    • 14:00 15:00
      Gather.Town: Career/Networking

      https://gather.town/app/j2Ozbwz01WxI9YKH/CMB-S4

    • 16:00 17:00
      EPO Event - Teen Jeopardy 1h

      Are you READY! We are launching our first-ever CMB-S4 Jeopardy Night! Are you up for an evening of physics fun? Join us for an evening filled with science research challenges. What a great way to represent your high school and win fun prizes! CMB-S4 scientists will be joining you to share stories about their career paths and prepare you for VICTORY! Let the Games Begin!

      Register at: https://forms.gle/sMv7pMaCGuYh3ccX7

    • 07:00 08:00
      Gather.Town: Social

      https://gather.town/app/j2Ozbwz01WxI9YKH/CMB-S4

    • 08:00 08:35
      Backlighting the Baryons with CMB-S4: Plenary Summary Report
      Conveners: Alexie Leauthaud (UCSC) , Simone Ferraro (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)
    • 08:35 09:10
      Gravitational Waves: Plenary Summary Report
      Conveners: Raphael Flauger (UC San Diego) , Sarah Shandera (Pennsylvania State University;)
      • 08:35
        Gravitational Waves: Plenary Summary Report 35m
        Speaker: Sarah Shandera (Pennsylvania State University;)
    • 09:10 09:45
      The Galactic ISM in 3D: Plenary Summary Report
      Conveners: Brandon Hensley (Princeton University) , Gina Panopoulou (Caltech)
    • 09:45 10:05
      Break 20m
    • 10:05 10:20
      From the Dark Ages to Reionization with CMB-S4: Plenary Introduction
      Conveners: Marcelo Alvarez (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) , Zhilei Xu (MIT)
    • 10:20 10:35
      Astrophysics and Cosmology with Galaxy Clusters: Plenary Introduction
      Conveners: Heidi Wu (Boise State University) , Srinivasan Raghunathan (NCSA/UIUC)
    • 10:35 10:50
      Snowmass Planning and CMB-S4: Plenary Introduction
      Conveners: Clarence Chang (Argonne National Laboratory;University of Chicago) , Scott Dodelson (Carnegie Mellon University)
    • 10:50 11:10
      Break 20m
    • 11:10 14:00
      Astrophysics and Cosmology with Galaxy Clusters: Parallel
      Zoom Meeting ID
      93459835239
      Host
      Clusters Working Group
      Zoom URL
      Conveners: Heidi Wu (Boise State University) , Srinivasan Raghunathan (NCSA/UIUC)
      • 11:10
        eRosita 15m
        Speaker: Vittorio Ghirardini (Max Planck Institute MPE)
      • 11:25
        SPTxDES Cluster Cosmology 15m
        Speaker: Sebastian Bocquet (LMU Munich)
      • 11:40
        Understanding the mass and galaxy distribution in Clusters: A perspective from the edge of DM halos 15m
        Speaker: Susmita Adhikari (University of Chicago)
      • 11:55
        Synergy between optical, SZ, and X-ray: Lessons learned from DES Cluster Cosmology 15m
        Speaker: Dr Tesla Jeltema (University of California, Santa Cruz)
      • 12:10
        Discussion 15m
      • 12:25
        Mid-Parallel Break 20m
      • 12:45
        Cluster science using the synergy between CMB-S4 and Lynx 15m
        Speaker: Dr Grant Tremblay (Harvard University)
      • 13:00
        Gas in the outskirts of galaxy clusters 15m
        Speaker: Eric Baxter (University of Hawaii)
      • 13:15
        Baryon pasting + high-z cluster virialization models 30m
        Speakers: Daisuke Nagai (Yale University;) , Dr Erwin Lau (Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory) , Dr Han Aung (Yale University)
      • 13:45
        Discussion 15m
    • 11:10 14:00
      From the Dark Ages to Reionization with CMB-S4: Parallel
      Zoom Meeting ID
      97500471586
      Host
      Sources Working Group
      Zoom URL
      Conveners: Marcelo Alvarez (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) , Zhilei Xu (MIT)
      • 11:10
        Introduction to Reionization 30m

        The Epoch of Reionization (EoR) -- when ultraviolet photons emitted by the first stars and galaxies transformed the intergalactic medium from mostly neutral to mostly ionized -- is a primary science motivation of many current and upcoming facilities. The landscape of experiments is diverse, with some seeking a detection of the ionization field itself, and others instead going after the sources and sinks of ionizing photons. In this talk, I will briefly review the physics of reionization and the many ways in which it can in principle be constrained observationally. I will focus on the latest observational constraints and advances in theoretical modeling, and how the next generation of experiments can help fill key gaps in our current understanding of reionization, and ultimately, galaxy formation and cosmology.

        Speaker: Jordan Mirocha (McGill University)
      • 11:40
        Physical modelling of patchy reionization 15m

        The epoch of cosmic reionization can be probed using the secondary anisotropies imprinted on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization field. I will discuss the imprints of patchy reionization on the kSZ power spectrum and CMB B-mode polarization. I will introduce two new scaling relations to connect the kSZ and secondary B-mode power spectrum with the physics of reionization. I will discuss the advantage of a joint study of the kSZ signal and secondary B-mode polarization from CMB-S4 to get a better understanding of the epoch of reionization.

        Speaker: Suvodip Mukherjee (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris;University of Amsterdam)
      • 11:55
        The high-redshift tail of stellar reionization in LCDM is beyond the reach of the low-ell CMB 15m

        The first generation (Pop-III) stars can ionize 1-10% of the universe by z=15, when the metal-enriched (Pop-II) stars may contribute negligibly to the ionization. This low ionization tail might leave detectable imprints on the large-scale CMB E-mode polarization. However, we show that physical models for reionization are unlikely to be sufficiently extended to detect any parameter beyond the total optical depth through reionization. This result is driven in part by the total optical depth inferred by Planck 2018, indicating a reionization midpoint around z=8, which in combination with the requirement that reionization completes by z~5.5 limits the amplitude of an extended tail. To demonstrate this, we perform semi-analytic calculations of reionization including Pop-III star formation in minihalos with Lyman-Werner feedback. We find that standard Pop-III models need to produce very extended reionization at z>15 to be distinguishable at 2-sigma from Pop-II-only models, assuming a cosmic variance-limited measurement of the low-ell EE power spectrum. However, we show that unless appealing to extreme Pop-III scenarios, structure formation makes it quite challenging to produce high enough Thomson scattering optical depth from z>15, tau(z>15), and still be consistent with other observational constraints on reionization.

        Speaker: Xiaohan Wu (Harvard CfA)
      • 12:10
        Status of Reionization-Era Line Intensity Mapping 15m

        Recent years have seen an explosion in the number of line intensity mapping experiments, particularly those targeting the Epoch of Reionization. By targeting unresolved emission of a variety of spectral lines, these surveys will provide new windows into the nature of the high-redshift objects responsible for ionizing the interstellar medium. In this talk, I will briefly summarize the status of current and near-future experimental efforts, explore the scientific results they hope to obtain, and highlight important open questions as we move into the next generation of cosmological surveys.

        Speaker: Patrick Breysse (New York University)
      • 12:25
        Mid-Parallel Break 20m
      • 12:45
        Cross-correlating patchy kSZ with other probes of reionization 15m

        The kinematic Sunyaev-Zel’dovich (kSZ) effect contains a contribution from the inhomogeneous reionization process, and encodes valuable information about how reionization progressed. We examine several upcoming opportunities for cross-correlating the kSZ signal with other probes of Cosmic Dawn and the Epoch of Reionization. Specifically, we look at the 21cm signal, measured by radio interferometers such as HERA and the SKA, and wide-field high-redshift galaxy surveys, such as those from the Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope. We show that in the sample variance-limited regime, a statistically significant cross-correlation signal is present. However, contamination from other signals, such as the primary CMB, may present observational difficulties. In particular, the foreground contamination for the 21cm signal presents a unique challenge that must be overcome to make a detection. We talk about potential methods for overcoming these difficulties, as well as prospects for future experiments.

        Speaker: Paul La Plante (UC Berkeley)
      • 13:00
        Constraining reionization with the CMB optical depth fluctuation - Compton-y cross-correlation 15m

        In the era of the high-precision CMB measurements, in addition to the conventional power spectrum, other observables will help to constrain cosmology. For example, the gravitational lensing effect introduces correlations between different modes of CMB fluctuations. This mode-mode correlation has been used to reconstruct gravitational lensing from CMB data. Other secondary effects could also produce a similar mode-couplings in CMB. In this talk, I will introduce my recent works on constraining reionization through the optical depth fluctuations which cause another type of mode-mode correlation in CMB anisotropies. I will present the first measurement of the cross-correlation between optical-depth fluctuations --- Compton-y map for constraining reionization with Planck data.

        Speaker: Toshiya Namikawa (University of Cambridge;)
      • 13:15
        First Upper Limits from HERA on the 21 cm Power Spectrum 15m

        In this talk, I will present the first power spectrum upper limits from the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA), a purpose-built 21 cm experiment under construction in South Africa. I will highlight several of the supporting efforts---especially calibration and systematics mitigation---that build confidence in our result and in our instrument more generally. Finally, I will discuss how this milestone for the HERA team fits into our broader quest to detect and characterize the 21 cm power spectrum from the Cosmic Dawn and how such a measurement will complement CMB-S4.

        Speaker: Josh Dillon (UC Berkeley)
      • 13:30
        Discussion 30m
    • 11:10 14:00
      Snowmass Planning and CMB-S4: Parallel
      Zoom Meeting ID
      91427144192
      Host
      Low-ell BB Working Group
      Zoom URL
      Conveners: Clarence Chang (Argonne National Laboratory;University of Chicago) , Scott Dodelson (Carnegie Mellon University)
      • 11:10
        CF3. Dark Matter: Cosmic Probes 15m
        Speaker: Alex Drlica-Wagner (Fermilab/UChicago)
      • 11:25
        CF4. Dark Energy and Cosmic Acceleration: The Modern Universe 15m
        Speaker: Anze Slosar (Brookhaven National Laboratory;)
      • 11:40
        CF5. Dark Energy and Cosmic Acceleration: Cosmic Dawn and Before 15m
        Speaker: Deirdre Shoemaker (UT Austin)
      • 11:55
        CF6. Dark Energy and Cosmic Acceleration: Complementarity of Probes and New Facilities 15m
        Speaker: David Schlegel (Lawrence Berkeley National Lab)
      • 12:10
        CF7. Cosmic Probes of Fundamental Physics 15m
        Speaker: Ke Fang (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
      • 12:25
        Mid-Parallel Break 20m
      • 12:45
        TF09: Astro-particle physics and cosmology 15m
        Speaker: Daniel Green (UC San Diego)
      • 13:00
        Discussion 1h
        Speaker: Scott Dodelson (Carnegie Mellon University)
    • 14:00 15:00
      Gather.Town: How to get involved in EPO

      https://gather.town/app/j2Ozbwz01WxI9YKH/CMB-S4

    • 07:00 08:00
      Gather.Town: Social

      https://gather.town/app/j2Ozbwz01WxI9YKH/CMB-S4

    • 08:00 08:35
      From the Dark Ages to Reionization with CMB-S4: Summary Report
      Conveners: Marcelo Alvarez (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) , Zhilei Xu (MIT)
    • 08:35 09:10
      Astrophysics and Cosmology with Galaxy Clusters: Summary Report
      Conveners: Heidi Wu (Boise State University) , Srinivasan Raghunathan (NCSA/UIUC)
      • 08:35
        Astrophysics and Cosmology with Galaxy Clusters: Summary Report 35m
        Speaker: Heidi Wu (Boise State University)
    • 09:10 09:45
      Snowmass Planning and CMB-S4: Summary Report
      Conveners: Clarence Chang (Argonne National Laboratory;University of Chicago) , Scott Dodelson (Carnegie Mellon University)
      • 09:10
        Snowmass Planning and CMB-S4: Summary Report 35m
        Speaker: Scott Dodelson (Carnegie Mellon University)
    • 09:45 10:05
      Break 20m
    • 10:05 10:50
      Poster Session in Gather.Town

      https://gather.town/app/j2Ozbwz01WxI9YKH/CMB-S4

    • 10:50 11:10
      Break 20m
    • 11:10 12:25
      Junior Scientist Talks
      Convener: Darcy Barron (University of New Mexico)
      • 11:10
        Likelihood-approximations for large-scale CMB data 15m

        Upcoming large angular scale CMB surveys aim at measuring the scalar-to-tensor ratio r, to determine the energy scale of inflation, and the optical depth to reionization tau. To measure these systematics and noise dominated signals, flexible likelihood approximation techniques are required. We present novel methods from likelihood approximations to likelihood-free inference techniques and improved systematics modelling for CMB surveys.

        Speaker: Roger de Belsunce (University of Cambridge)
      • 11:25
        Simulating and Mitigating the Atmospheric Effects for CMB ground-based Observations 15m

        In this talk, I will present the simulation status of the atmospheric effects for the LSPE/Strip telescope. In particular, I will emphasize how this technique can be easily applied at the other CMB ground-based experiments like QUBIC that will observe the CMB from the Atacama sky

        Speaker: Stefano Mandelli
      • 11:40
        Forecasting Constraints on Squeezed-limit Non-Gaussianity Through μ-T Correlations Using CMB-S4 and SKA 15m

        Acoustic dampening of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) power spectrum results from imperfect photon-baryon coupling in the pre-recombination plasma. At redshift 5 × 104 < z < 2 × 106 , the plasma has an effective chemical potential, and energy injections from acoustic dampening in this era create μ- type spectral distortions of the CMB. These μ-distortions trace the underlying photon density fluctuations, probing the primordial power spectrum from 50 Mpc−1 < k < 104 Mpc−1 . Small-scale power modulated by long-wavelength modes from squeezed-limit non-Gaussianities introduces cross-correlations between CMB temperature anisotropies and μ-distortions. Under single-field inflation models, μT correlations measured from an observer in an inertial frame should be exactly zero, thus any measured correlation rules out single- field inflation models. We are forecasting how well CMB-S4 + SKA1 & 2 can constrain primordial squeezed- limit non-Gaussianity—parameterized by fNL—using measurements of C μT ` . Using current specifications and foreground modeling, we expect σ(fNL) ∼ 5.

        Speaker: David Zegeye (University of Chicago)
      • 11:55
        Taurus: A Balloon-borne Polarimeter for Cosmic Reionization and Galactic Dust 15m
        Speaker: Steven Benton (Princeton University)
      • 12:10
        B-mode constraint from SPIDER's first flight with SMICA: a spectral based component separation pipeline. 15m
        Speaker: Corwin Shiu (Princeton University;)
    • 12:25 12:40
      Plenary
      • 12:25
        Closeout 15m
        Speakers: John Carlstrom (University of Chicago;Argonne National Laboratory) , Julian Borrill (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory & UC Berkeley)
    • 12:40 14:00
      Gather.Town: Social

      https://gather.town/app/j2Ozbwz01WxI9YKH/CMB-S4